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Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
Cultivate Hawaii Tea Towels Oskar’s Boutique Home
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Tea Towels

Vendor
Cultivate Hawaii
Regular price
$20.00
Sale price
$20.00
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

These all-natural flour-sack cotton towels are soft, absorbent, and infuse tropical flair to any kitchen or house.

All of our tea towels are made with high quality flour sack cotton and printed with water based inks.

Additionally, all towels are washed and pre-shrunk prior to shipping, allowing the size and shade of each tea towel to vary slightly, and making each towel unique.

Full size: (w) 18” x (h) 31”

Folded size: (w) 4.5” x (h) 9”

Printed on natural flour sack cotton towels.

Designed and made in Hawaii.

Each towel comes individually folded and banded.

Ohia Towel:

“One of the most beautiful trees in Hawaii, Ohia lehua, is also the most common. From sea level to 7,000 ft, Ohia inhabits nearly all forest types, provides habitat for countless plants and animals and plays a crucial role in capturing rainfall. Legend says the tree originated when a jealous Pele, transformed a man named Ohia into a twisted gnarled tree, leaving his lover Lehua devastated . Out of pity the other gods transformed her into a blossom on the Ohia tree which when picked will cause the lovers tears to fall from the sky as rain .”

Wa'a Inspiration:

"Cast off into the vast expanse of blue, Polynesian voyagers set out to find new lands in seaworthy canoe or wa'a. Plants and animals needed to start a new life in unknown lands were carefully stowed and preserved through months of high seas. Cooperation and harmony were of the utmost importance aboard. He wa'a he moku, He moku he wa'a-The canoe is an island, and an island a canoe”

Pele Inspiration:

"Seventy million years ago, long before they were touched by the hand of man, the Hawaiian Islands were born in the bosom of Pele, the Goddess of Fire. They began to emerge from the ocean, each evolving into a mysterious verdant paradise, and then, with time, falling back into the sea.

The beautiful island chain we know today is growing still, as Pele is at work creating Lo'ihi, 1,000 meters beneath the ocean's surface off the coast of Hawai`i Island."

Kalo Inspiration:

"Kahawai "the place of the fresh water"  refers to the lush river valleys of the islands, such as Hanalei on Kauai, used by Hawaiians to grow Kalo or Taro. 

Cultivated in constant flowing water, Kalo was the staff of life for ancient peoples which explains why the Hawaiian word for wealth and prosperity is wai wai, or water water. Indeed one does not exist without the other.”

Makana Inspiration:

"Towering over the crystal clear waters pf Ha`ena is Makana, meaning "the gift" in Hawaiian. The dazzling centerpiece of the North Shore, Makana is sacred to the people of the area and was famous as one of the two places Hawaii where the O`ahi fire throwing ceremony was carried out. A special celebration honoring graduates of Ha`era's prestigious hula school, fiery rockets of papery wood were launched from the steep summit, sailing far out to sea. Those daring enough to catch the firebrands in canoes were guaranteed good luck."

Waikiki Inspiration:

“Nestled below the slopes of Lē’ahi (Diamond Head) lies Waikīkī, the crown jewel of the Kona district of O’ahu. Perfect waves and pristine beauty made the area a favorite dwelling place for Oahu's ali’i - kings and chiefs - who held the sport of surfing in the highest regard. Translating to “spouting water”, Waikīkī's abundant springs, and rich natural resources created the most fertile conditions for kalo cultivation on the island of O’ahu. Secret lagoons, fantastic fishing, perfect beaches and safe harbors insured abundance and a comfortable life for all who lived there.”

Haleakala Inspiration:

"Haleakala - meaning “the house of the sun” - is one of the most sacred places on Māui and considered the realm of the gods.  From the volcanos beautiful summit, it’s said that the Hawaiian demigod Māui captured the sun’s rays with his lasso, forcing it to slow down half the year, and thus creating the seasons. Now a National Park, the crater is home to many endangered plants and animals, including the Haleakalā Silversword - āhinahina - found nowhere else on earth."

Nāpali Inspiration:

“A mysterious unparalleled coastline, Napali stretches for 16 miles along northwestern Kauai, accessible only by sea or the demanding Kalalau trail. In ancient times steadfast people lived in the remote, beautiful valleys alongside unique flora and fauna. The rarest and most curious of the native plants, the Alula or Brighamia insignis, which oddly resembles a cabbage on a bowling pin, thrived along the towering cliff faces, clinging to the walls with strong roots.”

Waimea Inspiration:

We salute big wave surfing from it’s beginnings to today through the lens of Waimea Bay,  a place with a sacred reminder of Hawaii’s mixed cultural history. In ancient times Waimea was known as “valley of the priests”, ruled by powerful Kahuna and flanked on both sides by hei’au (temples). As missionaries arrived with a new religion, the bay became home to the iconic Catholic Church you see today. And where past and present collide, the ancient Hawaiian art of surfing continues its reign at Waimea Bay, where perfect conditions create giant waves that lure the surfing elite of the world to this day.

Hokule'a Inspiration:

“As steady as the stars that guided them, Polynesian voyaging canoes plied the vast Pacific Ocean, searching for new worlds. Without modern instruments, ancient navigators relied on the sun and stars, ocean currents, swell patterns, and the activities of birds and sea creatures to chart their path into the unknown. Hōkūle'a, one of the brightest stars in the northern hemisphere, travels directly above the latitude of Hawaii, and was instrumental in finding the island chain. Use of these methods required constant awareness of your surroundings- you cannot know where you are unless you know where you came from.”

Pa'imalau Inspiration:

“Drifting into Hawaiian waters when the trade winds are strong, Pa`imalau or Portuguese man o’ war is nobody’s favorite sea creature but their elegant beauty is undeniable. Often mistaken for a jellyfish, Pa`imalau is actually a symbiotic colony of individual animals called zooids, all working together to nab a bite to eat! Like any successful colony each individual has its specialty- some zooids keep the colony afloat and sailing on course while others are experts in stinging, reproduction and feeding”

Moana Inspiration:

“For eons, the many islands of the great Pacific Ocean existed without human contact, inhabited only by the plants and animals tenacious enough to reach them. Around 2000 years ago, this same tenacity allowed Polynesians in voyaging canoes to venture out into  Moana, the deep ocean in search of new lands. This exploration led them as far as South America and islands off Antartica, allowing unique cultures to develop from Hawaii to New Zealand and the many isles in between.”